what kind of "diet"

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Home Forums Weight Loss and Thyroid what kind of "diet"

This topic contains 7 replies, has 8 voices, and was last updated by  YvonneCopeland 3 days, 22 hours ago.

Viewing 8 posts - 1 through 8 (of 8 total)
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  • #231

    christina
    Participant

    Looking for a diet that will help me feel better – hypo thyroid for 14 years, no energy to exercise. should i try the “atkins” – all protien type of diet/lifestyle change?? looking for ideas on what has worked for other people.

    #232

    drlizlyster
    Participant

    This is a huge question. There is no single answer. The best tool for weight loss is one you can stick to and use effectively. Options range from oral medications (including phentermine, bupropion/naltrexone, phendimetrazine) to injections (HCG, leptin-sensitizing diabetic injectable medications [off-label use]), to meal-replacement programs. Rather than “diet”, call it an eating plan, and start there. Metabolism goes into a fat-burning state for most people when calorie intake is around 1000 kcal per day. This can be done using meal replacements such as bars or shakes, and also with real food following a program like the South Beach diet. This can give good progress as long as it does not create a problem with reverse T3 (such as if you are on the appropriate thyroid replacement medication). Slower but steady progress can also be made at 1200-1500 calories per day. You need extra calories on days you exercise. The closer WHAT you eat is to a “paleo” diet (vegetables, fruit and lean protein) the better results you will get. For long term success, I prefer balanced eating programs (rather than Atkins) and moderate exercise (rather than intense).

    #1090

    BuffyB
    Participant

    I am hypo and have had tremendous trouble loosing weight, always seems to linger around the same #. I am considered obese for my height and am really tired of being that way. We eat well almost 90% of the time, fruit, vege, chicken. I am so at a loss!

    #1121

    Dr. Evans
    Participant

    Buffy, if you are hypothyroid, eating well and still having problems losing weight, it is highly likely that your thyroid medication is still too low. When thyroid is optimal, the body responds in a healthy way to appropriate diet and lifestyle management.

    #2704

    Lbore
    Member

    Just an FYI, I believe I have hypothyroid and paleo diet seemed to increase symptoms i.e. extreme senitivity to cold, crying spells. I did lose about 5 lbs however I could not maintain the diet because I was literally feeling sick. It may work for you if you are on the appropriate medication for your condition but be aware that a low carb diet may not work for everyone.

    #2740

    siccatum
    Participant

    Weight gain is also a symptom of hypothyroidism. While there are multiple reasons for being overweight, low metabolism from being hypothyroid should be seriously considered.
    This is not the common thinking among dieticians, medical professionals, and pill merchants.
    Perhaps we are now four generations after the era when most people grew their own food or had firsthand knowledge about it, we are now living in a world where most food comes from a factory and is being promoted my extreme commercialism.
    Shortly, most people do not even know what real food is, and what it is not, and have never seen it. What is left looking like food is poisoned with hormones, pesticides, herbicides and what not. While at one time infectious disease was a big killer, our food supply is now tainted with innumerable toxins and questionable substances, the new health hazards are different, cancer and hear disease are major causes of death. While applying toxins to our skin in the form of cosmetics et cetera, the largest chemical load is the tons of food “trapped” in our intestines, where our poor bodies has to sort out the wheat from the chaff. During the course of a single years a truck load of substances pass thru our gut. Numerically this should be the most likely cause of problems.

    Read about toxins above to the right. A low supply of iodine, together with similar halogens that substitutes iodine, will cause the thyroid or what is left of it, to not produce working thyroxin. Bromine, chlorine and fluoride are common in our environment, and are part of big commercial operations, with low legal oversight.
    As a result this is one of the harmful agents that can cause hypothyroidism and weight gain.

    There is no oversight or responsibility to make sure our food supply and health care system is operating for the common interest and health. Commercial gain is more important.
    This means everyone should stop thinking health and wellness is somebody elses responsibility, and necessarily means everyone has to become informed and take responsibility for their own health, all this in the middle of a storm of misinformation. This is a real drag, and an unfortunate circumstance we all have been dumped into.

    Hypothyroidism is much more common than most think. If it goes far enough to warrant the curiosity of a thyroid blood test, the standard for evaluating results have been biased by an oversupply of hypothyroid people, if the test even responds.

    #4085

    KrisScarborough
    Participant

    I know its too late, but want to ask you Christina how are you today?

    #4167

    YvonneCopeland
    Participant

    I was looking for some options so that I can find some delicious recipes. I found a blog about guide minceur. This will help me to eat healthy and also have my weight under control. I am planning to try this and I hope I get good benefits. The guide minceur will also guide me about healthy and nutritious recipes.

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