Need help interpreting my labs

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This topic contains 1 reply, has 2 voices, and was last updated by  siccatum 2 months, 3 weeks ago.

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  • #4257

    Anna S.
    Participant

    For the past year, I have been experiencing increasing problems with my health. I have Hashimoto’s and I am currently on 75 mcg Synthroid. I have chronic muscle pain/knots and stiffness, and low energy/fatigue (among other hypo symptoms), which has become debilitating and has prompted me to seek all kinds of modalities to help (naturopath, physio, massage, osteopath, etc). A hormone balancing specialist (not endocrinologist however) suggested I add a T3 medication (Cytomel 5 mg) to see if it helps. My family doctor will not manage my thyroid beyond looking at TSH and has not referred me to endocrinology in spite of numerous visits. I am concerned about the T3 medication and I am unsure how to interpret my labs and if indeed my T3/Reverse T3 ratio is suboptimal. Any help/suggestions would be greatly appreciated.

    Triiodothyronine Free [Free T3]
    4.0 pmol/L

    Reverse T3
    19 ng/dL
     

    #4258

    siccatum
    Participant

    The healthy thyroid normally produces T3, it is not a “medication”, it is a hormone replacement.
    T4-monotherapy has long since been discounted by serious professionals. In at least 20% of patients it does not work.
    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21829633
    Lab tests for thyroid related values assumes a medicated response is the same as the healthy one. There is no proof of this, but rather the opposite.
    Medicating according to lab tests will prove futile. When you feel well, with the correct hormone replacement, you can look at those lab values and say “Hmmmm… thats interesting”.
    I’ve been on this trip for over twenty years. First T4-mono, then T4+T3+atenolol, then NDT.
    Hypothyroidism is not diabetes.

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