Low TSH and low T4

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Home Forums Start Your Own Topic Low TSH and low T4

This topic contains 1 reply, has 2 voices, and was last updated by  Adelthea17 2 months, 3 weeks ago.

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  • #4124

    srboelter
    Participant

    I recently went to the doctors because I had sudden weight gain (#40 in 5months), sudden depression, fatigue, mood swings, hair loss, dry skin, swollen joints, digestive issues, memory loss, and more. My labs came back that my TSH is .14 and T4 is .9. My doctor said I had hyperthyroidism due to the TSH being low. She said to come back in 4 weeks for another blood tests. No treatment at this time. From what I’ve been reading though a low TSH and T4 is secondary hypothyroidism caused by a problem with the pituitary gland. In most cases caused by a tumor. I feel 4 weeks is to long to wait and that I have been misdiagnosed.

    #4128

    Adelthea17
    Participant

    Why are some doctors so….well, stupid? Don’t they learn anything in medical school? TSH is produced by the pituitary gland, T4 by the thyroid gland. Your T4 is low because the pituitary gland is not sending enough TSH to the thyroid. Most likely, your thyroid is normal, it is just not being stimulated properly. Only an incompetent doctor who knows nothing about the endocrine system would say something so idiotic as “you’re hyper because your TSH is low.” Unbelievable!
    You have already shown yourself to be smarter than your doctor by finding out that low TSH + low thyroid can mean a pituitary problem. An oversupply of cortisol, as in Cushing’s disease, can suppress TSH. Most doctors dont like to test for Cushing’s because it’s been drilled into their nonfunctioning brains that it is a rare disease. Researchers are finding it is actually fairly common. If you dont know of a good doctor you can see right now, you can order a cortisol saliva test online. Test your late-night cortisol. It’s supposed to be almost zero at night, so if it’s elevated you’ve got your answer. High night cortisol is often caused by a pituitary tumor or occasionally an adrenal gland tumor. That sounds scary, but they are nearly always benign. It is believed that one out of every 8 people walking around today has a pit tumor but either they never have symptoms or they are never properly diagnosed because of incompetent docs like your own. Good on you for doing your research, and good luck with your medical issue. You’re on your way to a proper diagnosis and a solution to your problem.

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