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Thyroid Problems Are a Headache!

thyroid-causing-headaches

Thyroid dysfunction is such a headache! It’s hard having to cope with the extremely long list of symptoms and being unable to find relief. The symptoms of thyroid dysfunction aren’t just headaches; did you know that it can actually cause and intensify headaches? Yes, headaches are on the long list of symptoms associated with thyroid dysfunction.

First and foremost, what are headaches? That seems like a very easy question considering that most of us have experienced a headache at some point, but it may be more detailed than you think. Headaches are classified as pain located not only in the head, but also in the upper neck. The pain stems from the tissues that surround the skull or brain. Any of the surrounding tissues or muscles can become inflamed causing a headache which can range in severity from a dull ache to sharp pain.

While this definition gives us a general picture of headaches, it doesn’t expound on the various types of headaches that can be experienced.

The most common type of headache is a tension headache. These are caused from muscles contractions that result in mild to moderate pain. Another common form of headaches is the dreaded migraine. Migraines tend to be a result of blood vessel contractions in the brain, but the exact cause is still debated. Migraines cause pounding pain that can last anywhere from a few hours to a few days. They also can result in altered vision, sensitivity to noise and odor, nausea, vomiting, and loss of appetite.

The most severe type of primary headaches are cluster headaches, thankfully they are also the least common. The pain is described as intense and even a burning or piercing sensation normally located in the eye region. These headaches tend to come in groups, hence the name “cluster” headaches. They can be experienced multiple times per day and can last anywhere from a few days to a few months.

Other forms of headaches include sinus headaches, acute and chronic headaches, as well as hormone headaches. Thyroid dysfunction and headaches are typically referred to as a comorbid conditions, meaning that these are two separate conditions that simply coexist. That being said, comorbid conditions also tend to make the diagnosis and treatment process more difficult, as well as intensify the symptoms of the other condition.

The intensifying condition in this case is thyroid dysfunction and it can cause headaches or make them more severe. Research is still being conducted on the connection between headaches and hormones. Headache and pain management expert, Dr. John Clause Krusz, states, “Thyroid and other endocrine hormones can play a notable role in the development of headaches and migraines, and in their failure to respond to treatment.”1

This is a warning for all people, but especially women because women have a higher risk for thyroid dysfunction: if you are exhibiting some hypo or hyperthyroid symptoms and you have noticed that you tend to experience headaches, it is best to get your thyroid checked. Those headaches you’re experiencing may be an indication of an underlying condition.

1. http://headaches.about.com/od/comorbidconditions/a/thyroid_comorb.htm

About the Author

Naomi Parker

Patient Advocate

Naomi Parker is a patient advocate that is enthralled by the medical field. Hypothyroidism became a topic of interest over the last few years while she worked amongst alternative medicine doctors as a front office assistant. She believes that information is key and strives to become better informed so as to help others achieve success and wellness.

Naomi has written various articles concerning hypothyroidism including information on diagnostics and treatment. She enjoys learning alongside others and passing on vital information regarding this condition. Naomi is actively monitoring and writing for the National Academy of Hypothyroidism both on the site and social media.

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Katy
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Katy

I was diagnosed with hypothyroidism 13 years ago at 25. About 5 years ago I began experiencing bad migraines and they have gotten much worse. I now take 75 mg of Topamax daily, 100 mg of Imitrex (when needed, sometimes 4 a week), and my daily 75 mcg synthroid. I am recently embarking an elimination diet to seek if this will help. Alcohol is a #1 trigger, sugar, and gluten. So any suggestions from other sufferers would be greatly appreciated!
Thanks

Tracy Parish
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Tracy Parish

I’m not sure what kind of headaches you’re having. My is on the back left side of my head and burns in an arch over my ear and up to my left temple – I’ve suffered for 10 years and after tons of my own research hit upon what I believe it is: Trigeminal Neuralgia. Dr. Raymond Sekula is the best and treated my cousin with an operation called Microvascular Decompression Surgery and he has not had a headache in the 7 years since. You may want to read about it and see if that is what you have. Other… Read more »

Coollette
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Coollette

Last year I was diagnosed with hasimotos and have been on synthroid started at 112mg daily then 3 months later up’d it to 137mg. Within the last 4-5 months I’ve been experiencing extremely bad headaches. Never have I had or expirenced a headache at least not like this. I’m in bed for days at a time it’s so bad. Recently my doctor wanted to try pig thyroid pills so I’ve been taking them for 2 weeks now. And I honestly feel so much better. I’ve probably only had a headache 3 times. Where before I was having them everyday almost… Read more »

kashif
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kashif

Dear you should go for homeopathy treatment. That will be good for you. Really it works

Crystal
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Crystal

My headaches are on the crown of my head. If it gets bad enough, it can go toward the back of my head and neck, too. I am on Armour Thyroid 60 mg. It still needs adjustment I’m sure, because I have only been on it for a few weeks. I got switched in mid-August. I am not sweating during my Tae Bo sessions as well, and I don’t usually go #2 for a week or more; I don’t have a need to go. Could my headaches be from my thyroid problem and what can I do to relieve them… Read more »

Denise
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Denise

I am going on 3 years of a constant headache. The intensity waxes and wanes but it is always there. The common point that the pain radiates from is on my left side where my head and neck meet. Nausea, muscle spasms and numbness are common. I had ct and cat scans when it started with no cause found. When this started I was working out religiously and eating clean, I had dropped about 135 lbs and was feeling great. Prior to my life style and diet change I was diagnosed with hashimotoes my anti bodies where in the 5oos… Read more »

Lina
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Lina

I was diagnosed with hypothyroidism 10 years ago, but these two years my headache after eating is getting worse and worse. I can’t even work. According my test results only T3 is low, what shall i do? Thank you.

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